Sport in History Podcast 46 – Nigel Hancock

Cricket this week with Nigel Hancock, who is the Chair of the Cricket Society. Nigel is the Chair of the Cricket Society, a well-regarded member organisation that exists to promote cricket in all its spheres – that is listening, reading, watching and playing. In particular, it has a regularly published Journal and bulletin; puts on live meetings with cricketers and the people who write about them; makes awards; runs Lunches and other events; and has its own cricket team.

Nigel talked to me about an exciting new initiative which will bring together the BSSH and the Cricket Society, as well as more generally about the Cricket Society and the benefits that it offers its members. I should offer full disclosure that I was recently brought on to the Executive of the Society as committee secretary so this is by no means the first time that Nigel and I had met.

There’s talk about both the BSSH’s and the Cricket Society’s 2020 book awards, the shortlists of which have been recently announced. And we also discuss a new award, the Howard Milton Award, which will be jointly run the the BSSH and CS to reward a cricket writer or organisation who has made a significant contribution to cricket history.

Nigel also talks about his own research into cricket crowds which he undertook at De Montfort University. The Cricket Society has a number of live events that would be of interest to both researchers in sports history and the general cricketing public. Their next event, with former England captain Charlotte Edwards, will be held online and is available to non-members – find out more here.

The Cricket Society, which is celebrating its 75th Anniversary in 2020, exists to promote cricket in all its spheres – listening, reading, watching and playing. In particular, it has a regularly published Journal and bulletin; puts on live meetings with cricketers and the people who write about them; makes awards; runs Lunches and other events; and has its own cricket team.

BSSH Podcast Sport

f1insburyparker View All →

Blue Badge guide to London and academic specialising in early twentieth century history. Blogging on history, academia, and food and culture in the capital (and occasionally elsewhere).

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