Archive for May, 2019

Resto 12 Irvin, Crouch End

May 14, 2019

In Crouch End to celebrate a friend’s impending departure on a three month jungle placement we couldn’t get in to our first choice, Bistro Aix, due to a party booking. Irvin turned out to be an excellent substitution.

Arriving early we warmed up with a Bellini and had a look at the menu while we waited for the rest of the party to arrive. Irvin’s thing is Scottish-Italian food, making me think of Paolozzi, Nardini, Nutini, benedetti, Ianucci, Macari … in fact quite a dazzling array of good people in the Italo-Scot line.

The most obvious manifestation of Irvin’s lineage comes in the shape of haggis arancini. Well, we had to have some of those! They were excellent – nutty haggis meat and not too heavy on the stomach. My own starter of freshly prepared crab was also very good with a healthy flesh to veg ratio. A main of venison was cooked to perfection and arrived with a generous portion of roasted new spuds. I was tempted to splurge on dessert but wiser heads prevailed, despite the temptation of home made ices (I’ll have to go back for those).

A small but well-chosen wine list made it difficult to decide what to stick alongside but an Alto Adige white followed by a Puglian red was a knockout combination and helped conversation along admirably. And then, and then .. what this? Three grappas on offer? Well it would seem daft not to give two of them a go when celebrating. Thank heavens for the long-ish walk home to walk it all off.

With excellent service throughout and design that shows a close attention to detail Irvin is a very happy-making place. And the tempting bar makes it an attractive venue for a pitstop of wine and small plates during the upcoming Crouch End Festival. I’ll be back.

9/10

To see where else I’ve eaten go to the GoogleMap …

Uncle Vanya at Hope Theatre

May 8, 2019

The curse of Sport v Art struck again last night as once more I missed out on one of the matches of the century in favour of spending an evening at the theatre. However, Uncle Vanya at the Hope Theatre was such an excellent production that I have no regrets whatsoever about missing Liverpool’s romping victory over the smug Catalans.

The adaptation, by Brendan Murray, skilfully strips away a couple of characters in order to deliver a sleek 80 minute version that loses none of the brittle tragicomedy of Chekhov’s original. This allows director James Stone to give us a very intimate view of the relationships between the characters in the small space above the Hope & Anchor on Upper Street.

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The set is minimal but filled with telling detail – I especially liked the map of Africa. In our group we disagreed about which performers we thought were the strongest but all agreed that they were excellent. I especially liked Adrian Wheeler’s Vanya, he delivered a performance which by turns (and often at the same time) brought out the comedy, bitterness and stoicism of a character with whom it was all too easy for me to empathise!

I heartily recommend this show.

#theatre #London

 

Sport & Leisure History Seminar 2019 #7

May 5, 2019

Monday May 13th 2019

How Could it be that You Just Want to Play a Game, and Somehow Somebody Somewhere has to Sanction it’: The 1994 Women’s Rugby World Cup.

It’s a real pleasure to be one of the convenors for the British Society of Sports History sponsored Sport & Leisure History seminar series at the Insitute of Historical Research. And for the new term we have a diverse range of speakers and subjects to pique the interest of the historically inclined.

The Rugby Union season will draw to a close in style with Lydia Furse of De Montfort University giving a paper on the second edition of the Women’s World Cup in 1994. Do come along for a story of female triumph over male machinations. Lydia has given us a sneak preview of one of her images from the tournament …

AF Thistle.jpgSo in this year of the Women’s Football and Netball World Cups do come along to celebrate another women’s sport and to listen to a talented young researcher. An abstract can be found below.

In January 1994, the Netherlands withdrew as hosts for the proposed second women’s rugby world cup. Within days of the news breaking, a determined group of Scottish rugby players had begun to arrange an alternative world championship in Edinburgh for April that same year. The 1994 tournament served as a test to the independence of women’s rugby, demonstrated the extremes of relations between male and female rugby administrations, and highlighted the irrepressible enthusiasm of women who just wanted to play their game. Individuals took action in the face of perceived injustice; whether explicitly feminist or not, these actions occurred in a wider political context. This paper explores the events surrounding the 1994 Women’s Rugby World Championship to explore how women’s rugby can be more than just a game.

This is only the one of a number of series of stimulating talks to be held at the IHR in the S&L series. For the details of seminars forthcoming in 2019 go to the IHR’s website. The talks take place in the John S Cohen on the second floor – doors open from 17:15 and the seminar to start promptly at 17:30. I hope to see you there.

 


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