Archive for the ‘cricket’ Category

Cricket and Society in South Africa, 1910–1971

October 12, 2018

Cricket&SocietyinSA

Thanks to the encouragement and energy of the editorial team of Bruce Murray, Richard Parry and Jonty Winch Cricket and Society in South Africa, 1910-1971 is now in print as part of Palgrave’s series of studies in sport and politics. The largest guffaw of the BSSH’s* recent conference came when one of the delegates said that sport and politics shouldn’t mix. Our book is a c. 70,000 word refutation of that statement.

My own chapter looks at the career of Percy Sherwell, first captain of the ‘Summerboks’ and all round imperial biffer for Britain. Further chapters broaden the scope of the traditional historiography of cricket in South Africa beyond tales of great white men to examine cricket amongst the black and Asian communities as well as women’s cricket. Or as the publisher puts it the book

  • explores Southern Africa’s sporting image, grounding it in analyses of the subaltern class that have been hitherto marginalised or ignored
  • traces imperial networks beyond the UK as mediator of empire, and brings women’s role in the sporting politics of Empire into clearer focus and
  • challenges the dominant narrative of Imperial sports history by interrogating and filling in the gaps and silences in the record of the excluded

Naturally, I would encourage anyone with an interest in cricket history to buy a copy, or ask your library to secure one. Further details can be found here.

*British Society of Sports Historians

Publication: Cricket in the West Indies

October 31, 2017

Thanks to those generous folks at Taylor and Francis the first 50 people to access my latest article, The ‘White Man’s Game’? West Indian Cricket Tours of the 1900s can access the article for free at the link below …

http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/pFQ2VR6CR42ynrWFdWVC/full

It’s not just for academic specialists, I think the general reader who is interested in the history of cricket, the Caribbean or the British Empire would find it worth a look. I would write a summary here but it’s easier to reprint the abstract …

The 1900s saw two tours of the United Kingdom (UK) by a mixed race cricket team representing the West Indies. This paper argues that the tours were part of a concerted cultural campaign largely organized by the West India Committee to raise the profile of the British West Indian colonies in the Mother Country in the light of competition for favour among the settler colonies. It analyzes the selection of the team and its reception in the UK to argue that the existing literature has been mistaken in portraying the team to have been subject to consistent hostility due to the inclusion of black players in the touring party. Rather it is argued that the team of 1900 was largely welcomed as a truly representative West Indian team but that by 1906 a tightening of the definition of who could represent the empire on the sports field, influenced by the settlement of the South Africa War, meant that mixed race cricket would be rejected and the West Indians unjustly excluded from the Imperial Cricket Conference, which became an all whites club.

I should also warn that it discusses a distasteful, racist cartoon from the Edwardian period whose significance in the coverage of the tour I question. And I balance that illustration with some more positive coverage of the first West Indian teams to tour the UK in the 1900s.

YouthWI

‘Youthful cricketers’

#cricket #westindies


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